24 March 2014

the 2014 asparagus post


The earliest yet, though not the sweetest spears on the bed if I'm not mistaken, but let's wait and see.

Elsewhere...


Hyacinths: each year we plant the spent bulbs we grow indoors, and this year their scent has pervaded the whole plot; and endive which has flourished in the face of total neglect on our part, and total benevolence on the part of the mild winter.


Wild garlic is putting in an appearance in the scuzzy hidden space behind the shed,


while on the sunny side it's almost tropical with flowering bay and imminent yucca flowers.


And amid all this promise, an almost certain unhappy end for the mouse - or was it a young rat? - that our feline neighbour Pixie flushed it out of the currant bush.

I suddenly feel like I've missed the bus.



8 comments:

rusty duck said...

Quite incredible. If it weren't for the daffs I'd have guessed May from the shed shot. It looks so lush.

annjennyg said...

I love the tropical garden in front of your shed - wonderful! I keep deliberating whether to plant asparagus on our plot.

Jane Housham said...

What an idyll! Lovely photos, as always.

colleen said...

On asparagus - if you have enough space, I'd definitely recommend it, though it is an exercise in deferred gratification, preferable to Lent if you ask me. We cut for around 6 weeks, feed it with seaweed - just another excuse for a trip to the seaside

It was quite remarkable yesterday. The birds were singing like mad things and when the sun was out it was really warm. Such a disgrace that there are no seeds in yet...

Val , Kate, The Cute Kitten ,Razzy, Kepsey,Darwin ,Charon and Echo. said...

Brilliant photos ....We have bright Sun and fast lengthening days so it's cheerful here.

Erm May I borrow Pixie we have 4 cats but I distinctly saw a grey furry bottom and tail fleeing ..and it wasn't outside... this is not good.

The youngest of our formally avid mousers are 15 in June so methinks I better do something about it myself!

E15 kids said...

Have been watching the new allotments taking shape near Pudding Mill Lane on the train ride from Stratford to Liverpool Street. I'm really looking forward to future years when they will be a riot of colour. I am hoping that people will get to personalise their sheds - all a bit boring at the moment. In my garden I am anxiously waiting for the mulberry that we painstakingly transferred after six years (from pot to ground) to bloom into life. Maybe this year it will fruit!

Joan

colleen said...

Joan - There is a mulberry in my neighbour's garden - the bane of my life. It is far too big for a thirty foot garden, and each time it is cut back puts on a growth spurt taking more and more of my light each year. It has been blown down twice in big storms, but bounces back, and I fear it will go on for 400 years like King James's mulberry at Charlton. It's saving grace are that the birds like it - I can live with purple splodges on our york stones - and it does look lovely in autumn time as the leaves stay very late.

Val - sounds like those mousers have earned their retirment!

E15 kids said...

Colleen. It will be some years - if ever - before our mulberry troubles our neighbours. It is only 4 ft tall and, as we took out two 13 ft tall cordylines in order to relocate it our neighbours are currently benefitting from big skies! But it is a real problem, isn't it, planting things that will grow to the right size. When we took over our narrow (typical Victorian terrace) but 90 ft long garden we found the previous owners had planted as if it was Chatsworth. The google earth image of it at that time looked like a rainforest.

My favourite mulberries are the ones in Bunhill fields and at Lambeth Palace.

Joan