07 July 2011

why...


Why is there only one sunflower on the whole plot growing among the potatoes when it wasn't sown there when none of those we did sow have come up at all, and neither have the leaf chard, half the beetroot and ninety percent of the leeks?

\

Why are our neighbours already eating their beans when ours haven't even reached the top of the very lovely hazel-pole wigwam?


Why did these nasturtiums, that failed to appear last year, suddenly decide to turn up en masse?


Why do we put in too many courgette plants, never manage to pick the courgettes before they get too big (although the cucumbers are perfect) and then spend so long trawling books to find novel ways to cook them that we end up leaving them and going to bed; and why did I put into the wormery the egg box that I'd written down the plan of where I had planted all my potatoes so that now I don't know which are which; and why oh why do I never, ever tie up my tomato plants until it's too late.  I just know they will have been beaten into the ground by the torrential showers we had today, though I'm hoping against hope that my beautiful Mexican hollyhocks from Jeanette will have survived the downpour.


And why the bloomin' heck did I decide on a log-cabin design at my quilting class when it would surely have been quicker to build a proper log cabin (6-8 weeks apparently, according to my web-based research) and move in?

Does any of this explain why I'm so tired?

11 comments:

Jude said...

Why? No idea, but that's why I've listed you on my fav blogs, because you are so interesting...
take care
Jude

Annie said...

I wish it was possible to 'like' a comment, because Jude's is spot on!

One sunflower amongst the potatoes is resplendent in its isolation, you will enjoy your beans all the more for having had to wait to taste them, and unexpected nasturtiums can only be a 'good thing' ... have to agree with you on the quilt though, it would have been quicker to build a log cabin, but it wouldn't have been as pretty ;)

Gerry Snape said...

Oh dear ...I need a degree in Psycology or at least some sort of ology to work it out! I too have one sunflower in the broad beans and the sown ones are drooping on 9 inch stems! Still in Ireland we say " taking the michael" well it's well and truly taken...but I'll survive.Though whether I survive tomorrows big garden party is another matter!!!

SmitoniusAndSonata said...

If you sew enough strips of pretty coloured cotton together , you'll be able to climb under that quilt and have a well earned rest .
Bummer about the chard , though . It usually takes over !

jeannette said...

i'm so happy to think the hollyhocks made it that far this far. there's been no rain here in new mexico since october.

Liz said...

Er, Sod's Law???

Rattling On said...

You are not alone... my French beans are 'low growing', my courgettes (in the greenhouse!)are bilou and the birds have eaten most of the berries. However, on a positive note, the garden looks like a prairie where the birds have scattered wheat seed. It loves it here... must get a grindstone.

Joanna said...

Haha - I love this! We do exactly the same with courgettes. And have you noticed how whenever you *do* find a good recipe it only uses some ridiculously small amount of courgette, so that it barely makes any difference to the stack you have managed to produce?

Clare said...

You could always make ratatouille with the extra courgettes?
Love the sunflower!

Esther Montgomery said...

Ask the worms about the potatoes. Few people know they can read - and when it comes to plans, they are experts. How otherwise would they find their way round the bin?

Esther

Flowering Trees Tennessee said...

Love the sunflower!
Thanks for sharing this post..